Category Archives: Recent News

Livable Communities and Transportation Options for the Boomer Generation

Walking through the park
By Katy Bryce, for Commute Options

Baby boomers, those between the ages of 50 and 69, are happy to call Central Oregon as their home, for the active lifestyle, great weather and tight community. In 2010, 28.6% of the population in Deschutes County were baby boomers, making them the largest demographic in the county. And this is population is increasing rapidly! Between 2010 and 2014, the 65 and older population in Deschutes County grew by 31 percent—the fastest rate of growth in all of Oregon.

Central Oregon communities must make a serious consideration and commitment to provide safe transportation options for this large segment of our population as they age. Beyond driving their own vehicle—until they can’t afford it or are physically unable to—the two modes of transportation that seniors rely on are walking and riding the bus. Urban planning for livability, safe and pleasant walking infrastructure and accessible and efficient public transportation will all be key elements to providing transportation options for the boomer generation.

Urban planning and livability. Boomers and seniors will greatly benefit from compact communities with easily accessed services so they have the option to walk to basic amenities such as health and fitness facilities, pharmacies, supermarkets and banks. Allowing a variety of housing options, such as Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), shared housing arrangements, apartments and assisted living facilities can help provide centralized housing to access such services.

Walkability. Walking is considered the most healthy and inexpensive form of transportation for all ages—and a wonderful way to get exercise, especially for seniors. There are often barriers that can be improved upon to help promote walking. Complete streets with continuous, well-maintained sidewalks and curb ramps are important for safe and pleasant walking. Off-street pedestrian pathways, such as in parks and along the river, are best when they have good visibility, are well lit, and have a uniform surface.

Public Transportation. Older adults have different travel patterns than the average working commuter and they use public transportation differently, for trips such as visiting friends or shopping. Baby boomers did not necessarily grow up using public transportation, so they may not be familiar with timetables and route maps. Public transportation should have easy to understand timetables, and routes with a range of schedules to accommodate older populations. Buses, bus facilities and bus stops should also have physical infrastructure to provide safe and enjoyable bus riding such as covers and benches.

Rick Root was a Transportation Planner for the City of Bend for 20 years and understands the necessity for mobility for all ages. “The local transportation system is not just about making driving easier, less congested or more pleasant. It is also about making a necessary and proportionate investment in any infrastructure that will support senior mobility. The next generation of decision-makers will inherit the growing demands of the baby boomer population.”

Maybe you are a baby boomer or know quite a few baby boomers. It is up to everyone in our community to provide transportation options for this influential generation. Remember too, transportation options that are good for the boomers are good for all ages!

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com

Get On the Bus

CET bus
By Katy Bryce, for Commute Options

The bus is coming! The bus is coming! No, the bus is here, and it’s waiting for you.

On September 21, Cascades East Transit (CET) expanded the Bend bus routes to better serve the community and get people where they need to be, when they need to be there. The expansion includes three additional routes, extended weekday hours of operation (to 8pm at night), and increased frequency during the week and on Saturdays. In short, Bend transit riders now have a 35% increase in service and better connectivity via east to west routes.

Judy Watts is the Outreach and Engagement Administrator for the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC), which operates CET. “Transit has become an essential part of the fabric of our community. It’s hard to believe that not long ago, transit service was unavailable. With expanded service in Bend and expanded services on the horizon for the entire region, CET looks forward to serving a vital transportation service for the region.”

We agree! A reliable and convenient bus system is a very important part of our community. Public transit allows all residents of all abilities to access jobs, school, health care and recreation. It also helps employers to retain employees by giving them a dependable and inexpensive option for commuting to and from work. We have a bus that goes to our ski area. It is just as important to have a bus that goes to medical offices, the colleges, business districts and employment centers.

How can you use the bus to get where you need to be?

Group Bus Passes. Commute Options offers Cascades East Transit bus passes to employees at partner businesses. At some point, businesses might face challenges in retaining workers that do not have access to reliable transportation. The Group Bus Pass is a very affordable benefit that businesses can offer to their employees that provides free, dependable public transportation. With the Group Bus Pass, you can retain employees and promote transportation alternatives. Contact Commute Options directly for this opportunity.

Monthly Pass. Individuals can purchase a monthly bus pass with Cascades East Transit. A monthly pass for the Bend Fixed Route service is $30. Do you spend more than $30 in gasoline (plus regular maintenance) commuting back and forth to work? If so, consider a monthly pass!

Bike and Ride. All CET buses have the capacity to carry bicycles. Get a little exercise by riding your bike to the bus stop, then hop on the bus to continue your journey. Or ride the bus to work in the morning, bring your bike and ride your bike on the way home—a happy mix of active transportation!

Ride and Ski. Winter is coming and you likely know how the road can be up to Mt. Bachelor. Purchase a Mountain Season Pass for $199 and enjoy the winter wonderland from the seat of a bus instead of gripped at the steering wheel. At 40 miles of travel for a round trip, this can pay for itself pretty quickly, depending on how often you use it.

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com

The Oregon Drive Less Challenge is Back! October 5 – 18.

DLC_2015_Logo
By Katy Bryce, for Commute Options

Get moving for 2015 Oregon Drive Less Challenge, Oct. 5-18! Discover healthy, green travel options for work, school and play that can save you money. Burn calories instead of gas by biking to work or divide the ride and the cost by carpooling. Take the bus and let someone else do the driving so you can relax and listen to music, or read that page-turning suspense thriller. Get quality time with your family by walking to the store.

Last year, Oregonians eliminated 1,082,491 motor miles over the 14-day Drive Less Challenge and Central Oregon alone made 11,440 trips using transportation options. This year, we hope to see record participation and enjoyment from the community.

Here’s how to participate:

Sign up at DriveLessConnect.com. Then, take the bus, carpool, vanpool, bike, walk and/or telework and log your trips. Any trip counts for all days, including weekends…for work, school, errands or play. You’ll be entered to win daily and grand prizes…KEEN shoes, Kindle Fires, REI gift cards, a custom Bike Friday folding bike, $500 cash cards & more! Plus, you’ll enjoy the many benefits of driving less! Get details & to sign up visit DriveLessConnect.com/Challenge.

Win Daily and Grand Prizes!
Thanks to top sponsors—PacificSource, Metromile and Amtrak Cascades—you could be one of over 100 winners in this year’s challenge. All participants have the opportunity to win prizes just for participating and logging trips. This year, in addition to the prizes below, we have some wonderful Central Oregon prizes from local businesses: Cascades East Transit, The Gear Fix, Ruffwear, Savory Spice Shop, Worthy Brewing, Hutch’s Bicycles, BendFilm, ExoBright and Deschutes Brewery. See official rules for prize eligibility details.

Daily Prizes
• Walk Mondays (Oct. 5 & 12) – $75 KEEN Gift Cards
• Train and Transit Tuesdays (Oct. 6 & 13) – Kindle Fires & Amtrak Cascades Tickets
• Rideshare Wednesdays (Oct. 7 & 14) – $25 Dutch Bros Gift Cards
• Telework Thursdays (Oct. 8 & 15) – $100 Office Depot Gift Cards
• Bike Fridays (Oct. 9 & 16) – Nutcase Helmets
• Walk Weekend Warrior Days (Oct. 10-11 & 17-18) – $50 REI Gift Cards

Grand Prizes
Log eight or more one-way trips to be entered to win a grand prize.
• Custom Bike Friday Folding Bike (value $2,600), plus Amtrak Cascades Tickets
• $500 VISA Cash Cards, plus Amtrak Cascades Tickets

Join this year’s challenge to discover what more you can get by driving less. www.drivelessconnect.com/challenge. Need information, help, or resources on how to drive less? Contact Commute Options. We can help!

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com

2015 Oregon Drive Less Challenge

HalfPageAd1_300x600The Oregon Drive Less Challenge is back!
Oct. 5 – 18, 2015

Time to get MORE in the 2015 Oregon Drive Less Challenge Oct. 5-18! Discover healthy, green travel options for work, school and play that can save you money. Burn calories instead of gas by biking to work. Divide the ride and the cost by carpooling. Take the bus and let someone else do the driving so you can relax and listen to music, or read that page-turning suspense thriller. Get quality time with your family by walking to the store. Log your trips at DriveLessConnect.com to win daily and grand prizes…KEEN shoes, Kindle Fires, Nutcase helmets, $500 cash cards, a custom Bike Friday folding bike & more!

More details & sign up at DriveLessConnect.com/Challenge!

Want to save money for that vacation? How about enjoying those potato chips guilt-free? And, wouldn’t it be nice to have a little fun in your day? You can, and more in the 2015 Oregon Drive Less Challenge Oct. 5-18!

It’s easy! Sign up at DriveLessConnect.com. Then, take the bus, train, carpool, vanpool, bike, walk and/or telework and log your trips. Any trip counts…for work, school, errands or play! You’ll be entered to win daily and grand prizes…KEEN shoes, Kindle Fires, Nutcase helmets, a custom Bike Friday folding bike, $500 cash cards & more! Plus, you’ll enjoy the many benefits of driving less!

Need help tapping into the many great travel options available in Central Oregon? You can access local transit, bike, carpooling, vanpooling and walking, plus telework information online in our Drive Less Central Oregon e-Kit

WIN DAILY & GRAND PRIZES

Thanks to our top sponsors—PacificSource, Metromile and Amtrak Cascades—we’ve got over $15,000 in daily and grand prizes to win this year!

DAILY PRIZES
Log trips on each day to win daily prizes (see official rules).

• Walk Mondays (Oct. 5 & 12) – $75 KEEN Gift Cards
• Train and Transit Tuesdays (Oct. 6 & 13) – Kindle Fires & Amtrak Cascades Tickets
• Rideshare Wednesdays (Oct. 7 & 14) – $25 Dutch Bros Gift Cards
• Telework Thursdays (Oct. 8 & 15) – $100 Office Depot Gift Cards
• Bike Fridays (Oct. 9 & 16) – Nutcase Helmets
• Weekend Warrior Days (Oct. 10-11 & 17-18) – $50 REI Gift Cards

GRAND PRIZES
Log eight or more one-way trips to be entered to win a grand prize (see official rules).

• Custom Bike Friday Folding Bike (value $2,600), plus Amtrak Cascades Tickets
• $500 VISA Cash Cards, plus Amtrak Cascades Tickets

Sign up at DriveLessConnect.com/Challenge!

Millennials Desire and Depend On Walking, Biking and Riding the Bus

ONDA employee Ben Gordon brings his pup to work by bicycle

By Katy Bryce, for Commute Options

The most recent U.S. Census report shows that Millennials, those between the ages of 15 and 33, have officially outnumbered the Baby Boomers, making them the largest and most diverse generation in history. Currently, Millennials comprise 26% of our population and are expected have a strong influence on our transportation and mobility systems now and in the future.

It is clear that Millennials will be a powerful generation of citizens and workers and you’ve likely heard interesting things about them—everything from “entitled” to “entrepreneurial.” One thing that all researchers can agree on is that this generation has a distinct way of choosing how and where to work and live and how to get from one place to another. This is important for communities and employers to know to attract and retain the Millennial workforce.

An early 2015 study by The Rockefeller Foundation and Transportation for America found that many Millennials want access to better transit options such as buses and trains, better walking and biking opportunities, and the ability to be less reliant on a car. That same study shows that 70% of Millennials who currently do not have regular access to a vehicle say they could not afford to live in an area without access to public transportation. 86% say that it is important that their city offer a low-cost public transportation system with affordable fares.

Millennials also demand a work-life balance from employers that includes the flexibility to work productively from anywhere, with the help of technology. Employers that embrace telework and flexible hours not only attract and retain younger employees, but also help promote transportation options by allowing their employees to work from home.

Kiki Dohman, Transportation Demand Management Specialist with Salem-Keizer Transit works with employers to develop transportation options programs that appeal to Millennials. “Millennials came into the workforce right at the recession, so they are cost and convenience driven. They are also independent, so they are more likely to use public transportation, walk or ride a bike, but they are less likely to carpool or vanpool. These are not just trends, but a reality for these folks—important distinctions to make when planning for future transportation systems.” Millennials also embrace the rapidly growing sharing economy and regularly use sharing services such as Airbnb, Uber and car and bike sharing services.

The Millennials are here and they are a big part of our communities and workforce. Generation Z, also known as the “digitarians”, are between 13 and 20 years old and they will demand even stronger alternative transportation systems. Dohman adds, “This generation was born into technology and they literally have everything at their fingertips. They don’t feel that they need cars and we are seeing a huge decline in the next generation even getting their drivers licenses.”

Jeff Monson, Executive Director for Commute Options adds, “The Millennials fit right into the goals of Commute Options. We want to offer better transportation options and technology, like a bike share program with a cell phone app, real time carpool matching and Wi-Fi on buses.”

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com

 

City of Redmond and U of O Students Work Together for Better Walking and Biking

UofO Students

By Katy Bryce, for Commute Options

“Where the rubber meets the road” is the point at which a theory or idea is put to a practical test.

In this case, it is where the bike tires and shoe soles meet the road. University of Oregon students are helping the City of Redmond get there—identifying real, practical, on-the-ground solutions for better, safer walking and bike riding.

Using professional skills and training, along with a fresh set of eyes, the students from the U of O Sustainable City Year Program are helping Redmond with their goal of increasing the amount of people biking and walking, both for transportation and recreation. The city of Redmond and the Redmond Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) identified a few key challenges and the students provided excellent ideas and solid plans for helping the community.

Heather Richards is the Redmond Community Development Director and a board member for Commute Options. Richards commended the students in bringing in new ideas, some of which are very affordable and community driven. “We identified eleven different aspects that we know need improvement, and the students came up with some great ideas. The cool thing about working with the students is that they bring a fresh perspective and have the liberty to get outside of the box with on-the-ground solutions to some of our challenges.”

Four examples of direct solutions included:

Challenge: Students attending John Tuck Elementary School have to cross 5th and 6th Streets on unprotected sections of road, with no stop signs or signals for cars to stop. Solution: Organize “walking school buses” that allow students and parents to walk together to school, creating a safer walking and street crossing environment, as well as providing a fun way to get to school.

Challenge: Dry Canyon has good biking and walking paths, but does not have obvious connectivity to downtown Redmond. Solution: Create and post way-finding signs in Dry Canyon using fun, colorful and easy-to-read for all ages “subway style” maps to navigate from Dry Canyon to downtown Redmond.

Challenge: Get more Redmond residents to walk and bike, for both transportation and recreation. Solution: Increase community presence to encourage residents to walk and bike more. This can include participating in local events and creating additional fun programs, such as bike scavenger hunts and organized rides, to inspire people to “Bike, Walk and Roll.”

Challenge: Make bicycling safer and more efficient in Redmond. Solution: Create and maintain better infrastructure for cycling, such as protected bike lanes, “sharrows” and two-way cycle streets. Some of this infrastructure already exists or needs slight modifications to make a big difference for people biking.

Next steps? “We’ll be bringing all of these ideas to our next BPAC meeting to first, identify and act on the “low hanging fruit” opportunities, such as walking school buses. We’ll then incorporate the solutions into our Transportation System Plan for future improvements,” says Richards.

Commute Options Executive Director, Jeff Monson adds, “The students developed amazing solutions that can be turned into real actions. Anyone would be encouraged by their passion and intelligence around solid transportation option planning principles.”

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com

 

Love Your Brain! Help raise funds for youth helmets

LYB-logo

The Center Foundation needs the community’s help with its first on-line fundraiser during the week of June 15-19th with the focus on brain and spinal cord injury prevention programs. “Love Your Brain” is a safety awareness and fundraising campaign designed to continue public awareness about the importance of helmets and identification of youth concussion and raise funds to sustain The Center Foundation helmet and concussion programs.  Our goal is to raise $10,000 in five days which will purchase several hundred helmets and dozens of concussion tests.

Last year The Center Foundation distributed 800 no-cost bike helmets to local youngsters, conducted over 1,000 concussion baseline tests and assisted over 100 concussed youth. The cost of a traumatic brain injury can be in the millions and our goal is to help prevent those injuries.

No amount is too small. To donate, please go to http://www.centerfoundation.org and PLEASE forward this to your own e-mail address book and help us get the word out.

Local Medical Facilities Include Commute Options to Reach Health and Wellness Goals

first street bridge with bikes photo

By Katy Bryce for Commute Options

Local health and medical facilities know that investing in employee health and wellness means a more satisfied, happy and productive workforce. Anthony Igou says it best. “I cannot stress the importance of the health and wellness of employees at our hospital as well as in our community as a whole. Health and wellness is multi-faceted, including nutrition, sleep, and exercise and the Commute Options program is a great compliment to our wellness programs to help our staff stay healthy.”

Igou is the Laboratory Outreach Coordinator for Sky Lakes Medical Center in Klamath Falls and facilitates Sky Lakes’ participation in the Commute Options Partner (COPs) program. Since enrolling in the program in October 2014, Sky Lakes offers various programs and benefits as part of their employee health and wellness benefits.

Employees can track trips and earn rewards through www.drivelessconnect.com. Sky Lakes also has outside bicycle lockers, inside bicycle storage, and showers available to encourage people to bike, run or walk to work. They organize bike-to-work challenges and outreach activities to educate their employees about the benefits of active transportation. “Biking, walking or running to work is a great opportunity to stay healthy while commuting to work. Then you don’t have to set aside extra time in your day to get exercise,” adds Igou.

Mid-Columbia Medical Center (MCMC) in The Dalles has participated in the COPs program for the last three years as an added benefit to employees. The facility draws staff from a large region, up to 35 miles away, so they recognize the importance of promoting carpooling for employees. MCMC also encourages nearby employees to walk and bike to work by providing bike parking and showers. Michele Spatz, Project and Mobility Coordinator for Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, encourages people to do what they can. “We like to tell people to start with one day a week for seven weeks. It takes seven weeks to form a habit, so that is a good start.”

St. Charles Medical Center in Bend signed up for the COPs program in April to first, reduce single-car occupancy in their parking lots and make more parking available for their patients and second, to encourage a more economical and environmentally friendly way for their caregivers to get to work. St. Charles already has an impressive 160 employees enrolled in the program since April.

Commute Options Community Outreach Director Kim Curley adds, “Walking, biking, carpooling and riding the bus to work have all shown to improve the health of your workforce. And what better industry to adopt active transportation goals than medical and health care providers? Hospitals and medical facilities are also large employers in our region and their participation in Commute Options is a huge benefit to our community as well. Chances are, you know someone who works at one of these facilities, so spread the word!”

Other local health partners include PacificSource, Bend Memorial Clinic, Mosaic Medical and the Deschutes County Health Department.

Commute Options offers their Partner Program to all businesses and organizations and can help your business create a healthy workplace and community.

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com

 

Commute Options Partners with Portland Design Works to Donate Bicycle Lights to Bethlehem Inn

B Inn

Shelter residents can “See and Be Seen” for safe bicycle commuting.

BEND, OREGON – Commute Options received a donation of 20 sets of bicycle lights to provide to Bethlehem Inn residents to be safe and seen while riding bikes to work. Portland Design Works, a Portland based cycling gear company, donated the light sets after the Bethlehem Inn posted a need for lights on their Facebook page. Bend resident Peter Werner saw the post and contacted Commute Options and Portland Design Works to arrange for the donation.

Many residents at Bethlehem Inn are employed and many of them ride bikes to and from work, often during early morning or late night shifts. Residents who have been at the shelter for over a week and are employed get priority use over the shelter’s donated bikes. The bike light sets will be checked out by residents for use while riding to and from work, providing a much needed tool for safe commuting.

Oregon state law OR815.280 requires a front white light and rear red reflector on bikes during limited visibility conditions. Bicyclists that do not have adequate lighting during dark hours risk a citation. Nate Gawlik, Americorp Volunteer at the Bethlehem Inn says, “This is a great thing. Residents risk being pulled over on their bikes for not having lights, which can be an added expense and stress. We truly thank Peter Werner, Commute Options and Portland Design Works for providing these lights.”

Bethlehem Inn residents will now not only be legal while biking, but also much safer. Bike lights greatly increase visibility, and the more visible a cyclist can be, the safer they are. Portland Design Works Marketing Manager Jocelyn Gaudi adds, “There was no need to think twice about it. We were happy to help out right away to help folks get to work safely and visibly regardless of the time of their shift.”

Kryptonite Bike Locks and Bell Helmets also donated to Bethlehem Inn.

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. Through active transportation choice, Commute Options encourages healthy individuals, a clean environment, and a strong economy. Commute Options represents transportation options in our community by educating citizens, businesses and government about the value of carpooling, vanpooling, walking, bicycling, teleworking and using public transportation. www.commuteoptions.org

 Portland Design Works was started by two Midwesterners who fell in love with Portland’s bike culture and wanted to be a part of it. Their motto is “simple, beautiful gear for everyday cycling.” www.ridepdw.com

 Bethlehem Inn’s mission is to transform lives with shelter, help and hope. They provide food and shelter for those experiencing homelessness in Central Oregon. www.bethleheminn.org

 Peter Werner is an attorney at Schmid Malone Buchanan, LLC and seeks to find solutions in his community. 

 

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Urban Trails Provide Important Opportunities for Active Transportation

Larkspur-Trail-051413-27

By Katy Bryce for Commute Options

Do you ever find yourself enjoying a sunny lunchtime stroll in Drake Park? Or does your morning bike commute take you along the river on a section of the Deschutes River Trail? Either way, you likely use some of our important urban trails and paths for having fun or for biking or walking to from one place to another.

Urban trails are an important part of providing multi-modal transportation options. They allow residents to access close-to-home recreation opportunities and provide off-street connections between neighborhoods, schools, parks and business centers. They provide active transportation that improves community health, creates livable neighborhoods and allows people of all ages and abilities to get outside and get moving.

Bend takes its trails seriously! Bend Park and Recreation District’s (BPRD) 2011 district-wide survey showed that soft surface and hard surface trails were by far the most valued and desired recreation amenities in Bend. BPRD currently manages 65 miles of urban trails within the district—about 0.8 miles per 1,000 residents.

BPRD Park and Trail Planner Steve Jorgensen shares that their goal is to provide trails for users of all comfort levels and abilities and to provide connectivity between residential areas, schools, parks and businesses. “For the past 20 plus years, our surveys show that residents value trails very highly. We are always looking for additional recreational opportunities and ways to connect trails and fill the gaps. Right now we are focusing on potential trails along canals and working on providing more east-west connections for the community.” BPRD also continually works on trails that leave Bend and connect to popular public land recreation areas, such as the Upper Deschutes River and Phil’s trail head.

BPRD coordinates closely with the City of Bend on our urban trail system. Robin Lewis, Transportation Engineer for the City of Bend adds, “Urban trails play an important role in our transportation system as they can traverse long distances with very little interaction with traffic. Trails, city streets, sidewalk and bike lanes are all necessary to complete the door-to-door connections for people. Important coordination efforts between the city and park district occur with trail-roadway crossings, way-finding signage, and access to routes to ensure a seamless system for everyone.”

For those who walk or bike to work, trails provide a reprieve from on-street traffic. Regular bike commuter Chris Kratsch commutes from the west side of Bend to the north end of town, off Empire Ave. “Utilizing the river trail at First Street Rapids is the best part of my commute. I get to ride on the river and see other people dog walking, running and bike commuting. It’s a nice way to start and end my day.”

Have you been on the 65 miles of trails in Bend? You might find that there are several trails and paths that you didn’t even know existed and they might be a great way to access other areas from your own neighborhood. Commute Options encourages everyone to check out Bend Park and Recreation’s full list of trails on their website at www.bendparksandrec.org/Parks_Trails/trail_list.

Commute Options promotes choices that reduce the impacts of driving alone. For more information, contact Executive Director, Jeff Monson at 541-330-2647 or visit www.commuteoptions.org

Katy Bryce is a freelance writer in Bend. www.katybryce.com